MUSO JIKIDEN EISHIN RYU IAIDO

      無雙直傳英信流居合

      MUSO JIKIDEN EISHIN RYU IAIDO

      無雙直傳英信流居合

      About Iaido
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      Iaido is the Japanese martial art of drawing the sword and cutting in a single motion. Iaido, as we know it today, originated almost 450 years ago in the Sengoku period of Japan, a time of constant wars. The originator, Jinsuke Shigenobu, formed the style that eventually became known as ‘Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu’ ( 無雙直傳英信流居合道 ), which was based upon his wartime experiences.

      Since that time, several related styles of Iaido have formed, but many which remain are based upon Muso Jikiden Eishin ryu (commonly called ‘Eishin Ryu’), and retain the core teachings of this style. As time passed and Japan entered an era of extended peace during the Tokugawa period, those who studied Iaido and many other martial arts, sought to find their place in a changing world. The need for pure combat efficiency took on a smaller role, and the desire to define purpose and meaning for the austere training methods of the martial arts gained importance.

      Today, Iaido training is primarily a vehicle for personal development. Iaido training is based on ‘kata’ and ‘kumitachi.’ Kata are prearranged practice forms done by one person, and kumitachi are performed in pairs. Kata and Kumitachi are the repository of the original combat strategies. Iaido training methods require intense mental and physical concentration. Repeating these forms, very precisely, over many years, provides a vehicle for physical and personal development, and a chance for students to better understand themselves and their place in the modern world.

      Our affiliation is with the Nichirei Dojo  near Ishikawa-dai station in southwest Tokyo, founded by Furuoka Masaru (Nittosai). We studied directly under Furuoka Masaru for many years. After his passing in 2006 his son, Furuoka Takashi Sensei, became the current headmaster of this line of Muso Jikiden Eishin ryu (see ‘Our Lineage’ below).

      Furuoka M. Sensei also developed a modern variation of Iaido, called Hiken Muso ryu Iaigiri-do, with strong emphasis on tameshigiri as an integral component of training.

      Furuoka Sensei at Gakken Dojo in southwest Tokyo [1]

       

      About Iaido
      Back to Top

      Iaido is the Japanese martial art of drawing the sword and cutting in a single motion. Iaido, as we know it today, originated almost 450 years ago in the Sengoku period of Japan, a time of constant wars. The originator, Jinsuke Shigenobu, formed the style that eventually became known as ‘Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu’ ( 無雙直傳英信流居合道 ), which was based upon his wartime experiences.

      Since that time, several related styles of Iaido have formed, but many which remain are based upon Muso Jikiden Eishin ryu (commonly called ‘Eishin Ryu’), and retain the core teachings of this style.

      As time passed and Japan entered an era of extended peace during the Tokugawa period, those who studied Iaido and many other martial arts, sought to find their place in a changing world. The need for pure combat efficiency took on a smaller role, and the desire to define purpose and meaning for the austere training methods of the martial arts gained importance.

      Today, Iaido training is primarily a vehicle for personal development. Iaido training is based on ‘kata’ and ‘kumitachi.’ Kata are prearranged practice forms done by one person, and kumitachi are performed in pairs. Kata and Kumitachi are the repository of the original combat strategies.

      Iaido training methods require intense mental and physical concentration. Repeating these forms, very precisely, over many years, provides a vehicle for physical and personal development, and a chance for students to better understand themselves and their place in the modern world.

      Our affiliation is with the Nichirei Dojo  near Ishikawa-dai station in southwest Tokyo, founded by Furuoka Masaru (Nittosai). We studied directly under Furuoka Masaru for many years. After his passing in 2006 his son, Furuoka Takashi Sensei, became the current headmaster of this line of Muso Jikiden Eishin ryu (see ‘Our Lineage’ below).

      Furuoka M. Sensei also developed a modern variation of Iaido, called Hiken Muso ryu Iaigiri-do, with strong emphasis on tameshigiri as an integral component of training.

      Furuoka Sensei at Gakken Dojo in southwest Tokyo [1]

      Iaido Kata (solo) & Kumitachi (paired)
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      Eishin Ryu Iaido has several groups of kata (solo practice) and kumitachi (paired practice) that gradually take a student from basic to advanced use of the Japanese sword. Progression is step-wise, starting from ‘seiza’ (a seated position) to standing. Generally the solo kata is taught first, then the kumitachi is added once the student has a good grasp of the basics.

      Training is with shinken and bokuto. In this school/dojo we do not use an iaito or moguito (unsharp practice sword) that is common in most, but not all, Iaido schools today. 

      While using a shinken (real Japanese sword) may sound dangerous… yes it can be. We do not take this training method lightly, and initial lessons are taught slowly and carefully. In fact most Iaido is practiced slowly as a general rule.

      Use Youtube to view an Eishin ryu demonstration vs. a Katori Shinto Ryu demonstration. You will see very different speeds of training, with Iaido being performed relatively much slower. Slower equals a very careful learning process designed to maximinze safety with the given weapon. 

      The benefits of properly learning to use a Japanese sword/shinken from the onset of one’s training reduces dangerous and counter productive habits that can occur when using an iaito (unsharpened practice sword).

      The belief is that the proper mindset, concentration, and swordsmanship skills produced by learning to use a real sword is of critical importance.

      1. Seiza no Bu

      正座之部

      Mae
      Migi
      Hidari
      Ushiro
      八重垣Yae Gakki
      受流Uke Nagashi
      介錯Kai Shaku
      附込Tsuke Komi
      月影Tsuki Kage
      追風Oi Kaze
      抜打Nuki Uchi

      2. Tate Hiza no Bu 

      立膝之部

      横雲Yoko Gumo
      虎一足Tora Issoku
      稲妻Inazuma
      浮雲Uki Gumo
      Oroshi
      岩波Iwa Nami
      鱗返Uroko Gaeshi
      波返Nami Gaeshi
      瀧落Taki Otoshi
      真向Makko

      3. Oku Iai Iwaza

      奥居合居業之部

      Kasumi
      脛囲Tsune Gakoi
      戸詰Tozume
      戸脇To Waki
      四方切Shiho Giri
      棚下Tanashita
      両詰Ryozume
      虎走Torabashiri
      抜打Nuki Uchi

      4. Oku Iai Tachi waza 

      奥居合立業

      行連Yuki Zure
      連達Tsure Dachi
      惣捲So Makkuri
      惣留So Dome
      信夫Shinobu
      行違Yuki Chigai
      袖摺返Sode Zuri Gaeshi
      門入Mon 'Iri
      壁添Kabe Zoi
      受流Uke Nagashi
      暇乞其の
      一, 二, 三
      Itto Magoi (3)

      5. Tachi Uchi no Kurai

      太刀打之位

      出合Deai
      拳取Kobushi Tori
      絶妙剣Zetsu Myoken
      独妙剣Doku Myoken
      鍔留Tsuba Dome
      請流Uke Nagashi
      真方Mappo
      水月刀Suigetsu To
      心明剣Shin Myoken
      月影Tsuki Kage

      6. Tsumeai no Kurai 

      詰合之位

      発早Hasso
      拳取Kobushi Tori
      波返Nami Gaeshi
      八重垣Yae Gakki
      鱗返Uroko Gaeshi
      位弛Kurai Yurumi
      燕返Tsubame Gaeshi
      眼関落Ganseki Otoshi
      水月刀Suigetsu To
      霞剣Kasumi Ken

      Our Lineage
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      Eishin ryu Iaido traces its lineage back to Hayashizaki Shigenobu and the founding of Hayashizaki Shin Muso ryu. As this developed over time various headmasters added to, or reorganized the curriculum and changed the name(s).

      Transmission was/is somewhat indiscriminate and allows for anyone who has received a menkyo kaiden (known as ‘Kongen no Maki’ in Eishin ryu) to further award licenses to any number of students. It is quite likely we do not know the full list of those having received this license.[2]

      Nonetheless, Eishin ryu continues today along numerous lines of transmission. All of these lines, in the large picture, essentially study the same kata, or sets of kata. With each line having its own ‘flavor’ or emphasis. Watching these various lines perform kata, one can usually understand and clearly see the kata being performed.

      This line of Eishin ryu uses the modern kyu/dan ranking system, from shodan/1 to hachidan/8 . The headmaster position is conferred full transmission of the art with the traditional license of ‘Kongen no Maki’. 

      Our line of  study is under Hirai Agisai -> Furuoka Masaru of the Nichirei dojo in southeast Tokyo -> and now his son Furuoka Takashi.

      Abridged lineage of Eishin Ryu

      Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu – founder of Hayashizaki Shin Musō-ryū (林崎新夢想流)

      Hasegawa Chikaranosuke Hidenobu (Eishin) – founder of Hasegawa Eishin-ryu (長谷川英信流)

      Hayashi Rokudaya Morimasa

      Shimomura-Ha

      Shimomura Shigeichi

      Nakayama Hiromichi (Hakudo) –
      founder Muso Shinden Ryu
      夢想神伝流

      No clear successor today

      Tanimura-ha

      Tanimura Kamenojo Takakatsu

      Goto Mogobei Masasuke

      Oe Masamichi (Masaji) – founder of
      Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu 無雙直傳英信流
      Numerous lines of transmission

      Okiyama Namio

      Fukui Harumasa

      Kono Hakuren – numerous students with no clear successor

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      Hirai Agisai

      Furuoka Masaru (Nittosai 1920-2006) – Furuoka Sensei also created a modern variant of Eishin ryu called ‘Hiken Muso Ryu’. With emphasis on tameshigiri based on Eishin ryu kata.

      Furuoka Sensei at his Shobukan Dojo near Shinagawa, Tokyo [1]

      Furuoka Takashi (b1946) current headmaster

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      Alternate Line


      Fukui Torao

      Related Dojo
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      USA – Shobukan Dojo | Foothills Budokai – Denver, Colorado,       Torrance Budokai – Torrance, California,

      Japan – Tokyo: Three(3) dojo near Ishikawadai station on the Tokyu-Ikegami line

      Nichirei Dojo (primary), Yukitani Middle School, Okuzawa Junior High 

      References

      1. Furuoka Nittosai, Hiken Muso Ryu Iaigiri, Gakken Publishing Co. 1983
      2. Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu